Medicare for All

Guaranteed, high-quality healthcare should be a right, not a privilege. Medicare, our single-payer system, must be improved and expanded to cover everyone, including coverage for women’s reproductive health.

From Runaway Inequality: An Activist’s Guide to Economic Justice

Dr. David Himmelstein and Dr. Stephanie Woolhandler, leading health cost researchers, write:

[P] er capita annual insurance overhead costs have tripled since 2006, reaching $731. Switching to a single-payer system today could save more than $400 billion annually on bureaucracy. These savings would make it possible to provide universal coverage without copayments or deductibles and with no increase in health expenditures. In contrast, the Affordable Care Act has added another layer of bureaucracy – the health insurance exchanges – that cost $6 billion to get up and running, or $750 per new enrollee. Economics texts preach that markets breed efficiency, but the most market-oriented health systems are the least efficient. The transformation of American healthcare into a business has sharply increased transaction costs and rewarded entrepreneurs for financial games that add no value.

Leopold, Les. Runaway Inequality: An Activist’s Guide to Economic Justice (p. 216). Labor Institute Press. Kindle Edition.

But in the long run, all logic leads to single-payer healthcare systems like Canada’s that will eliminate nearly all of the private health insurance industry and drastically curtail the price of prescription drugs. The cost and quality of care arguments for single-payer healthcare are overwhelming. (See Physicians for a National Health Program at www.pnhp.org and Labor Campaign for Single Payer www.laborforsinglepayer.org.)

Leopold, Les. Runaway Inequality: An Activist’s Guide to Economic Justice (p. 221). Labor Institute Press. Kindle Edition.